Common Grace Flowing at the Jersey Shore

Hurricane Sandy did a lot of mischief at the Jersey Shore, but grace is flowing.
Hurricane Sandy view from Mantoloking Rd. Brick, 10/31

UNINVITED GUEST: Hurricane Sandy left many things topsy-turvy at the Jersey Shore.

Hurricane Sandy did a whole lot of mischief here at the Jersey Shore. So much so that Halloween has been canceled* by order of the governor. I doubt anyone cares. We’re too busy looking for power, gasoline, and cell service to celebrate anything more than our safety and that of our loved ones.

Any Jersey Shore native worth his or her salt has lived through a few hurricanes and many a nor’easter. Few of us has seen anything like this. Where I live two miles inland from Mantoloking, New Jersey, we lost power and saw a lot of downed trees. A mile east and all the way to the bay, the water was four feet deep yesterday. The main road is clear today, but the smell of diesel fuel is strong closer to the bay that separates us from the barrier island. Boats that were knocked off their boatyard perches and found their way into the street and onto people’s porches.

Hurricane Sandy, Mantoloking Rd., Brick, NJ

I won’t lie. I was badly frightened Sunday evening as Sandy came barreling toward us. I watched the big, old trees swaying and worried that one in particular would come crashing down in my living room. As I considered that tree, I was reminded how often we fear the wrong things. I worried, for example, about many potential threats when my children were young. Mental illness was not one of them and it killed my child.

So I didn’t let the fear of that tree get the better of me. I stayed out of the living room during the witching hour and woke up Monday to find trees down in my neighbors’ yards, but only a large branch in mine.

Hurricane Sandy view from Mantoloking Rd. Brick, 10/31

I’m about to lose hundreds of dollars worth of food in my freezer as the 48-hour window for freshness closes and ice is a distant dream. The temperature is supposed to go down to the 30s tonight, so who knows, perhaps that problem will be solved by an uncomfortable grace.

No matter what happens, like millions of other people on the East Coast, I’m reminded again how uncertain life is and how little control we have over it. What we can control is how we prepare—physically, emotionally, relationally, and spiritually—and how we respond. Nerves are frayed and tempers are short, my own included. But generosity and kindness are strong.

Mantoloking Rd. Rescue, Hurricane Sandy

At the Hilton Garden Inn in Lakewood, New Jersey, where many are awaiting news of their island homes, the staff has been extraordinary, even to those of us who aren’t staying in the hotel. Business has been suspended in a sense and replaced by community service and compassion. Disasters, as we repeatedly learn are common grace moments. We should treasure them, even as we mourn and struggle through. I don’t have any thoughts more profound than that today.

*Correction: New Jersey Governor Chris Christie postponed Halloween until Nov. 5. He didn’t cancel it.

*Photos courtesy Explorations Media, L.L.C. Used with permission. Sourced via Flickr.
 
 

About the author, Christine A. Scheller

Christine A. Scheller is UrbanFaith's News & Religion editor. In past articles, she has explored her personal journeys in urban ministry and racial diversity. Email her at cascheller@explorationsmedia.com if you have news tips or story ideas.
  1. I’m glad you’re safe, Christine. And pondering that uncomfortable, common grace.

  2. Praise God that you’re safe and able to tell the story!

  3. Profound enough, Christine. I’ve been thinking/praying for you in this storm, knowing you were in New Jersey.

    It’s never the storm we’re looking for that gets us, is it?

  4. Thanks so much for the kind thoughts and words!

  5. Thanks for this peek into the aftermath of Sandy, from up-close. I’m praying you make it to Laity Lodge so I can give you a hug in person. :)

  6. Pingback: Common Grace Flowing at the Jersey Shore @UrbanFaith « Christine A. Scheller

  7. Even though this happened a few months ago already, I still feel sad when I come across news and pictures of the aftermath. Tragic events like this always tug at my heart because it makes me feel helpless and it makes me remember that nothing is permanent and any second, everything you have lived for can be taken away from you.